Interdisciplinary Experiences (3IE1/2/3)

The Arts & Science Program and Integrated Science Program have teamed up to offer new Interdisciplinary Experiences courses to their students this year. In his Forward with Integrity letter to the McMaster community, President Patrick Deane encourages the integration of experiential learning, self-directed learning, and interdisciplinarity into our undergraduate programs. The position paper generated by the Student Experience Task Force tasked with reflecting on President Deane’s letter recommends enhancement of “flexibility in structure, delivery and availability of courses.” In response to these recommendations, Arts & Science and iSci are offering a suite of new interdisciplinary experiential learning courses that may be offered in 1, 2 or 3-unit modules and can be taken by a student at any stage beyond Level I. Each module will involve experiential learning or application of science, social science or humanities topics in a field, community, classroom or laboratory setting. Students may take more than one module offered under this course code as long as the topics are different.

Interdisciplinary experiential learning opportunities selected from an assortment of modules. Content and schedules vary annually. Details may be found below or by contacting the Arts & Science Program Administrator Rebecca Bishop (rbishop@mcmaster.ca or ext. 23153). These courses are evaluated on a Pass/Fail basis. Some modules may require a fee to cover costs of travel and accommodation.

ARTSSCI 3IE1, 3IE2, 3IE3 may be repeated, if on a different topic. Enrolment is limited.

Please Note:

  • Payment of McMaster course credit fees (i.e. tuition and supplementary fees) for ARTSSCI/ISCI 3IE1 is in addition to the module fees if applicable.
  • Even if all funds for the trip are paid, you are ineligible to participate in the module if you have not registered in the course.
  • Submission of the necessary Release Form(s) must be submitted prior to the start of the course.

Please direct all inquiries to Rebecca Bishop at rbishop@mcmaster.ca or 905-525-9140 ext. 23153

Fall 2017 Modules

Grant Writing: Integrating Science, Sustainability and Community (ARTSSCI/ISCI 3IE1)

Instructor: Chad Harvey

The ability to research, write and apply for grant funding is a skill that is truly interdisciplinary. Whether an individual is pursuing a career in academics, government, or private industry, proficiency in grant writing is necessary and a highly marketable asset. Students will experience the entire grant writing process, from research of potential funding sources; scripting an appropriate background, purpose, budget and timeline; to writing and submission of the finished grant application.

Grants will be sought to support and maintain community outreach initiatives here at McMaster. Examples of these initiatives include the McMaster Teaching & Community Garden (MTCG), McMaster Outdoor Learning Space (MOLS), McMaster Forest, and McMarsh, a reclamation project for Parking Lot M. Other project ideas can be discussed with the Instructor as potential options for grant funding.

A weekly meeting time will be determined that works for everyone’s schedule once Term starts. This meeting time will be used to discuss various aspects and purposes of writing a grant and to keep tabs on progress throughout the process. Meetings will be informal and collaborative.

Electronics for the Rest of Us! Part I (ARTSSCI/ISCI 3IE1)

Instructors: Jason Brodeur and Matt McCollow

To most of us, the workings of the electronic devices that accompany (and enable!) our everyday lives often seem mysterious and opaque — an area of concern for only the most qualified ‘techies’.  Though a basic understanding of electronics and programming is generally viewed as a core competency for 21st century success, these topics remain intimidating, as they often appear inaccessible to many students from non-technical backgrounds. This doesn’t need to be the case. The development and widespread availability of inexpensive, user-friendly and well-documented electronics — such as the Arduino — has made learning and developing these skills accessible (and dare we say, even fun) for students of every age.  Such resources now make it possible for even the most inexperienced student to create with electronics, while simultaneously reaping the educational benefits associated with the application of logic and rules to make cool stuff.

This two-day workshop-style course aims to introduce students to the world of simple electronics and programming; give students an opportunity to develop their skills by designing and building a functional electronic device; and allow them to apply their skills and creativity in the process of creating an original device.

Module Schedule:
22 September 2017 5-9pm (Thode Library Makerspace)
23 September 2017 10:30am-4:30pm (Thode Library Makerspace)

Winter 2018 Modules

3D Printing for the Rest of Us! (ARTSSCI/ISCI 3IE1)

Instructors: Dale Askey and John Fink

3D printing has seen an explosion in popularity over the past few years. The technology is now settling to the point where it is becoming increasingly accessible to more people; however, most people however are still disintermediated from the process — they find a print online, take it to a printer, and have someone run the print off for them. This is completely wonderful and adequate for most people, but perhaps you’re the kind of person who wants to know more about how prints are made – from the design phase to the magical moment when your object comes off the printer bed. This course will be an introduction to that whole process, with the end result being a print that you designed yourself.

This three-day workshop style course aims to introduce students to 3D printing design software and hardware; give students an opportunity to apply their knowledge of software and hardware by producing a 3D printed object from start to finish; provide students with a greater understanding of the current and future state of 3D printing.

Module Schedule:

8 February 2018 5-8pm (Sherman Centre, Mills Library)
9 February 2018 4-6pm (Sherman Centre, Mills Library)
10 February 2018 11am-4pm (Sherman Centre, Mills Library)

McMaster University’s Nuclear Research Facilities (ARTSSCI/ISCI 3IE2)

Instructor: Andrea Armstrong

A week of experiential learning based at McMaster University’s Nuclear Research Facilities, including the McMaster Nuclear Reactor, the High Level Laboratory Facility, and the McMaster Accelerator Laboratory. Participants will be introduced to a wide range of nuclear science topics through a blend of practical sessions and classroom learning. In-class sessions will include an introduction to radioactivity, health effects of ionizing radiation and safe work practices, generation of radioactive materials, medical applications of radioisotopes, and neutron-based analysis techniques. Participants will get hands-on experience in detecting and characterizing radioactive materials, the production of radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals, neutron radiography, and more.

A background in nuclear science or engineering is neither expected nor required. Participants must consent to be designated as Nuclear Energy Workers.  For more information on NEW designation, see http://www.mcmaster.ca/healthphysics/users/faq.html.

Module Schedule:

20 February 2018 9am-4pm (Nuclear Research Facilities)
21 February 2018 9am-4pm (Nuclear Research Facilities)
22 February 2018 9am-4pm (Nuclear Research Facilities)
23 February 2018 9am-4pm (Nuclear Research Facilities)

Kentucky Caving Fieldtrip (ARTSSCI/ISCI 3IE1)

Instructors: John Maclachlan and Chad Harvey

This is a four-day fieldtrip to Cave City, Kentucky (21-24 February 2018) to explore karstic geomorphology, perform underground biological inventories, discuss the rich local caving history, and consider the environmental issues caused by mismanagement of these natural features. Among the caves visited will be the Hidden River Cave System, Cub Run Cave and an extensive tour of the largest cave system in the world, Mammoth Cave. Student evaluation will be based upon a pre-trip assignment, course participation, and a post-course reflection.

Please note that there is a $400 trip fee to cover accommodations, transportation, and park entrance fees.  A $150 deposit is due upon application submission.  All participants must have a valid passport for travel to the U.S.A.  Proof of valid passport must also be submitted with the application.

Module Schedule:
21-24 February 2018 (Cave City, Kentucky)

Egyptian Hieroglyphs (ARTSSCI/ISCI 3IE1)

Instructor: Sarah Symons

This module is an introduction to the script used by ancient Egyptians to decorate temples, tombs, and artefacts. Participants will learn principles of reading and translation via a combination of worksheets, exercises, and object studies. The objects are drawn from museum collections around the world and offer insight not only into the  language but also into the culture of ancient Egypt. The module consists of four three-hour evening workshops and some out-of-class study.  The module will end with a Saturday visit to the Royal Ontario Museum to view the Egyptian collection and try out newly-acquired reading skills.

Module Schedule:
26 February 2018 7-9pm (ThInk Space, Thode Library)
5 March 2018 7-9pm (ThInk Space, Thode Library)
12 March 2018 7-9pm (ThInk Space, Thode Library)
19 March 2018 7-9pm (ThInk Space, Thode Library)
24 March 2018 Time TBD (Royal Ontario Museum)

The Forge @ Mac: Student Entrepreneurship Explorations (ARTSSCI/ISCI 3IE1)

Instructor: Sarah Symons

This one-unit module will introduce students to entrepreneurship and The Forge. The Forge is Hamilton’s startup incubator and McMaster University’s on-campus entrepreneurship initiative.  The Forge supports new tech companies and students interested in entrepreneurship by providing co-working space across two locations (at McMaster Innovation Park and in downtown Hamilton), training, resources and a network of alumni and mentors. Students will be required to attend 3 of 10 workshops offered by The Forge during the winter term (listed below), attend 2 Makerspace Meetup sessions in The Thode Makerspace (Monday evenings, details to follow), and review The Forge Student Startup Competition Application.

Monday, January 8th- Makerspace Meetup Launch (every Monday)
Tuesday, January 9th- Startup Competition Information Session
Wednesday, January 17th- So you want to be an Entrepreneur?
Thursday, January 25th- The Art of the Fail
Saturday, January 27th-28th- Deltahacks Hackathon
Wednesday, February 7th- Build and Brand: How to leverage the value of storytelling
Saturday, February 10th- MSS: Quantum Leap Conference
Tuesday, February 13th- SSC x Forge: Find your Love for Entrepreneurship
Tuesday, March 6th- Story Series: From Degree to Company
Thursday, March 22nd- Student Startup Competition

Fall 2016 Modules

Urban Placemaking (ARTSSCI/ISCI 3IE1)

Instructors: Jackie Brown and Rosalind Pfaff

This module will explore the concept of urban placemaking, a collaborative process of animating public and private spaces to strengthen the social and cultural fabric of a city. We will delve into the use of arts-based practices, environmental resources, social enterprise, and civic engagement tools to reimagine underutilized properties. In addition, we will examine why placemaking projects are often guided by the principles of adaptive reuse, such as sustainable development and heritage preservation.

This is an experiential, place-based course. We will be exploring urban placemaking initiatives around the world, such as the Dorchester Projects in Chicago, the High Line in New York City, and the converted Tempelhof Airport in Berlin. We will visit examples of such projects in Toronto, including Artscape Youngplace, a community cultural hub housed in the former Shaw Street School. Using these spaces as case studies, students will participate in facilitated discussions about the challenges associated with ensuring that they are community-driven, adaptable, vibrant, and inclusive. Students will also have the opportunity to conduct independent research on a placemaking project of their choosing.

Please note that there is an additional $15 fee for this module and students will be responsible to cover their own travel costs associated with participating in the module (e.g. GO Transit and TTC passes).

Module Schedule:
22 October 2016 10am-5:30pm (Toronto)
23 October 2016 10am-4pm (Hamilton)
27 October 2016 7-9pm (Hamilton)

Enrolment Limit: 16 students
Application Deadline: 9 September 2016 at 1pm

The Forge @ Mac: Student Entrepreneurship Explorations (ARTSSCI/ISCI 3IE1)

Instructor: Dr. Jonathan Boulanger, The Forge Business Development Manager

This one-unit module will introduce students to The Forge @ Mac. The Forge is Hamilton’s startup incubator and McMaster University’s on-campus entrepreneurship initiative (The Forge@Mac). The Forge supports new tech companies and students interested in entrepreneurship by providing co-working space across two locations (at McMaster Innovation Park and in downtown Hamilton), training, resources and a network of alumni and mentors. Students will be required to attend 8 of 12 workshops running September 2016 – March 2017 and complete a culminating reflection about their experiences in order to successfully complete this module. Students are welcome to attend more seminars/workshops as they are interested. Students are also invited to participate in the Student Pitch and culminating Student Startup Competition.

Course Outline

Enrolment Limit: 15 students
Application Deadline: 14 September 2016 at 12pm

Winter 2017 Modules

Grant Writing: Integrating Science, Sustainability and Community (ARTSSCI/ISCI 3IE1)

Instructor: Chad Harvey

The ability to research, write and apply for grant funding is a skill that is truly interdisciplinary. Whether an individual is pursuing a career in academics, government, or private industry, proficiency in grant writing is necessary and a highly marketable asset. Students will experience the entire grant writing process, from research of potential funding sources; scripting an appropriate background, purpose, budget and timeline; to writing and submission of the finished grant application.

Grants will be sought to support and maintain community outreach initiatives here at McMaster. Examples of these initiatives include the McMaster Teaching & Community Garden (MTCG), McMaster Outdoor Learning Space (MOLS), McMaster Forest, and McMarsh, a reclamation project for Parking Lot M. Other project ideas can be discussed with the Instructor as potential options for grant funding.

A weekly meeting time will be determined that works for everyone’s schedule once Term starts. This meeting time will be used to discuss various aspects and purposes of writing a grant and to keep tabs on progress throughout the process. Meetings will be informal and collaborative.

Enrolment Limit: 8 students
Application Deadline: 9 September 2016 at 1pm

Electronics for the Rest of Us! Part I (ARTSSCI/ISCI 3IE1)

Instructors: Dale Askey, Jason Brodeur, John Fink and Matt McCallow

To most of us, the workings of the electronic devices that accompany (and enable!) our everyday lives often seem mysterious and opaque — an area of concern for only the most qualified ‘techies’.  Though a basic understanding of electronics and programming is generally viewed as a core competency for 21st century success, these topics remain intimidating, as they often appear inaccessible to many students from non-technical backgrounds. This doesn’t need to be the case. The development and widespread availability of inexpensive, user-friendly and well-documented electronics — such as the Arduino — has made learning and developing these skills accessible (and dare we say, even fun) for students of every age.  Such resources now make it possible for even the most inexperienced student to create with electronics, while simultaneously reaping the educational benefits associated with the application of logic and rules to make cool stuff.

Module Schedule:
26 January 2017 7-9pm (SCDS, Mills Library)
27 January 2017 5-9pm (ThInK Space, Thode Library)
28 January 2017 10am-4pm (SCDS, Mills Library)

Enrolment Limit: 15 students
Application Deadline: 7 December 2016 at 1pm

A Celebration of Winter as Place (ARTSSCI/ISCI 3IE1)

Instructors: Patrick Byrne and Bob Henderson

Winter is the misunderstood season. We will explore winter as a fundamental expression of Canadian identity through the lenses of history, geography, and literature. While travelling by snowshoes and skis, and of course sitting around the fire, we will examine key stories and characters in our Canadian understanding of winter, including Franklin, wendigos, Sam Magee, and Grey Owl. This exploration will also include the “idea of North” and the Norwegian friluftsliv approach to winter outdoor life. The central goal is to embrace the winter season as a “place” in our personal psyche and Canadian consciousness.

To do this we must be active in a thriving winter place where we are engaged in winter chores of chopping wood for our fires, drawing water from our ice hole, and clearing roofs of burdensome snow. We will learn the key winter activities of snowshoeing, cross-country skiing, building a snow shelter (Quinzee) and setting up a wall tent wood stove camp.

Please note that there is a $200 trip fee to cover accommodations, transportation, and equipment rentals.

Module Schedule:
17-20 February 2017 (Algonquin Park)

Enrolment Limit: 10 students
Application Deadline: 9 September 2016 at 1pm

Kentucky Caving Fieldtrip (ARTSSCI/ISCI 3IE1)

Instructors: John Maclachlan and Chad Harvey

This is a four-day fieldtrip to Cave City, Kentucky (23-26 February 2017) to explore karstic geomorphology, perform underground biological inventories, discuss the rich local caving history, and consider the environmental issues caused by mismanagement of these natural features. Among the caves visited will be the Hidden River Cave System, Cub Run Cave and an extensive tour of the largest cave system in the world, Mammoth Cave. Student evaluation will be based upon a pre-trip assignment, course participation, and a post-course reflection.

Please note that there is a $350 trip fee to cover accommodations, transportation, and park entrance fees.  A $100 deposit is due upon application submission.  All participants must have a valid passport for travel to the U.S.A.  Proof of valid passport must also be submitted with the application.

Module Schedule:
23-26 February 2017 (Cave City, Kentucky)

Application Deadline: 7 December 2016 at 1:00pm

Fall 2015 Modules

Grant Writing: Integrating Science, Sustainability and Community (ARTSSCI/ISCI 3IE1)

Instructor: Chad Harvey

The ability to research, write and apply for grant funding is a skill that is truly interdisciplinary.  Whether an individual is pursuing a career in academics, government, or private industry, proficiency in grant writing is necessary and a highly marketable asset. Students will experience the entire grant writing process, from research of potential funding sources; scripting an appropriate background, purpose, budget and timeline; to writing and submission of the finished grant application.

Grants will be sought to support and maintain community outreach initiatives here at McMaster. Examples of these initiatives include the McMaster Teaching & Community Garden (MTCG), McMaster Outdoor Learning Space (MOLS), McMaster Eco-Lab (MEL), and McMarsh, a reclamation project for Lot M. Students who register in this module will be contacted by the instructor in order to determine their meeting schedule.

Enrolment Limit: 8 students
Application Deadline: 9 September 2015 at 1pm

Electronics for the Rest of Us! Part I (ARTSSCI/ISCI 3IE1)

Instructors: Dale Askey, Jason Brodeur, John Fink and Matt McCallow

To most of us, the workings of the electronic devices that accompany (and enable!) our everyday lives often seem mysterious and opaque — an area of concern for only the most qualified ‘techies’. Though a basic understanding of electronics and programming is generally viewed as a core competency for 21st century success, these topics remain intimidating, as they often appear inaccessible to many students from non-technical backgrounds. This doesn’t need to be the case.

The development and widespread availability of inexpensive, user-friendly and well-documented electronics — such as the Arduino — has made learning and developing these skills accessible (and dare we say, even fun) for students of every age. Such resources now make it possible for even the most inexperienced student to create with electronics, while simultaneously reaping the educational benefits associated with the application of logic and rules to make cool stuff.

Over the span of 3 classes (1-3 October 2015) and open access to equipment and documentation, students will be introduced to the world of simple electronics and programming, and will have an opportunity to develop their skills by designing and building an electronic device of choice. There is no fee to attend this course and all materials will be provided.

Module Schedule:
1 October from 7pm-9pm (SCDS)
2 October from 5:30pm-9pm (ThinK Space)
3 October from 10:30am-4pm (SCDS)

Enrolment Limit: 20 students
Application Deadline: 9 September 2015 at 1pm

Kentucky Caving Fieldtrip (ARTSSCI/ISCI 3IE1)

Instructors: John Maclachlan and Chad Harvey

This is a four-day fieldtrip to Cave City, Kentucky (15-18 October 2015) to explore karstic geomorphology, perform underground biological inventories, discuss the rich local caving history, and consider the environmental issues caused by mismanagement of these natural features. Among the caves visited will be the Hidden River Cave System, Cub Run Cave and an extensive tour of the largest cave system in the world, Mammoth Cave. Student evaluation will be based upon a pre-trip assignment, course participation, and a post-course reflection.

Please note that there is a $350 trip fee to cover accommodations, transportation, and park entrance fees.  A $100 deposit is due upon application submission.  All participants must have a valid passport for travel to the U.S.A.  Proof of valid passport must also be submitted with the application.

Enrolment Limit: 18 students
Application Deadline: 9 September 2015 at 1:00pm

Exploring Celestial Phenomena in the Planetarium (ARTSSCI/ISCI 3IE1)

Instructor: Robert Cockcroft

You probably don’t have the time to watch celestial motions in real time, and even if you did they are so slow that they are hard to perceive.  The immersive environment in a planetarium provides a unique perspective that not only simulates the real night sky, but allows its manipulation.  The simulation can easily and quickly display celestial motions on many different timescales, from daily motion to motion over millennia, and can relocate the observer so that the simulation is centred at different locations around the Earth or from other celestial bodies in the Solar System.

Appreciating the motions of the celestial sphere is Important for making observations, predictions and understanding various astronomical phenomena.  During this course, you will explore several such phenomena by observing them in the planetarium, and suggesting plausible hypotheses for their cause.  As time and interest permits, you may also learn how to operate the planetarium and/or make or adapt simple software scripts.

The course will run on six consecutive Tuesday evenings in Term 1: Oct 20 and 27, and Nov 3, 10, 17 and 24.

Enrolment Limit: 20 students
Application Deadline: 9 September 2015 at 1pm

Winter 2016 Modules

A Celebration of Winter as Place (ARTSSCI/ISCI 3IE1)

Instructors: Patrick Byrne

Winter is the misunderstood season. We will explore winter as a fundamental expression of Canadian identity through the lenses of history, geography, and literature. While travelling by snowshoes and skis, and of course sitting around the fire, we will examine key stories and characters in our Canadian understanding of winter, including Franklin, wendigos, Sam Magee, and Grey Owl. This exploration will also include the “idea of North” and the Norwegian friluftsliv approach to winter outdoor life. The central goal is to embrace the winter season as a “place” in our personal psyche and Canadian consciousness.

To do this we must be active in a thriving winter place where we are engaged in winter chores of chopping wood for our fires, drawing water from our ice hole, and clearing roofs of burdensome snow. We will learn the key winter activities of snowshoeing, cross-country skiing, building a snow shelter (Quinzee) and setting up a wall tent wood stove camp. This course will take place in Algonquin Park from 12-15 February 2016.

Please note that there is a $200 trip fee to cover accommodations, transportation, and equipment rentals. A $100 deposit is due upon application submission.

Enrolment limit: 15 students
Application Deadline: 9 September 2015 at 1pm

Electronics for the Rest of Us, Part II: Adventure in the Making (ARTSSCI/ISCI 3IE1)

Instructors: Dale Askey, Jason Brodeur, John Fink and Matt McCallow

Prerequisite: Electronics for the Rest of Us! Or permission of the instructor

In this intermediate-level course, students will further develop their electronic prototyping and production skills to conceptualize, design and prototype a working electronic device. Individually or in groups, students will work in an internally-motivated manner, where instructors provide support, resources, instruction and guidance as needed. Students may choose to work with their previously-purchased Arduino devices and peripherals, or may consider other devices such as Raspberry Pis, Beaglebone boards, Phidgets and Microsoft Kinects.

Enrolment limit: 20 students
Application Deadline: 6 January 2016 at 1pm

Fall 2014 Modules

Kentucky Caving Fieldtrip (ARTSSCI/ISCI 3IE1)

Instructors: John Maclachlan and Chad Harvey

This is a four-day fieldtrip to Cave City, Kentucky (October 16th-19th) to explore karstic geomorphology, perform underground biological inventories, discuss the rich local caving history, and consider the environmental issues caused by mismanagement of these natural features. Among the caves visited will be the Hidden River Cave System, Cub Run Cave and an extensive tour of the largest cave system in the world, Mammoth Cave. Student evaluation will be based upon a pre-trip assignment, course participation, and a post-course reflection.

Please note that there is a $350 trip fee to cover accommodations, transportation, and park entrance fees.  A $100 deposit is due upon application submission.  All participants must have a valid passport for travel to the U.S.A.  Proof of valid passport must also be submitted with the application.

Enrolment Limit18 students
Application Deadline: September 10, 2014 at 1pm

Grant Writing: Integrating Science, Sustainability and Community (ARTSSCI/ISCI 3IE1)

Instructor: Chad Harvey

The ability to research, write and apply for grant funding is a skill that is truly interdisciplinary.  Whether an individual is pursuing a career in academics, government, or private industry, proficiency in grant writing is necessary and a highly marketable asset. Students will experience the entire grant writing process, from research of potential funding sources; scripting an appropriate background, purpose, budget and timeline; to writing and submission of the finished grant application.

Grants will be sought to support and maintain community outreach initiatives here at McMaster. Examples of these initiatives include the McMaster Teaching & Community Garden (MTCG), McMaster Outdoor Learning Space (MOLS), McMaster Eco-Lab (MEL), and McMarsh, a reclamation project for Lot M.

Enrolment Limit: 8 students
Application Deadline: September 10, 2014 at 1pm

Electronics for the Rest of Us! (ARTSSCI/ISCI 3IE1)

Instructors: Dale Askey, Jason Brodeur, John Fink and Matt McCallow

To most of us, the workings of the electronic devices that accompany (and enable!) our everyday lives often seem mysterious and opaque, an area of concern for only the most qualified “techies.” Though a basic understanding of electronics and programming is generally viewed as a core competency for 21st century success, these topics remain intimidating, as they often appear inaccessible to many students from non-technical disciplines. This doesn’t have to be the case. The development and widespread availability of inexpensive, user-friendly and well-documented electronics — such as the Arduino — has made learning and developing these skills accessible (and dare we say, even fun) for students of every age. Such resources now make it possible for even the most inexperienced student to create with electronics, while simultaneously reaping the educational benefits associated with the application of logic and rules to make cool stuff.

Over the span of 3 classes (September 18th-20th) and open access to equipment and documentation, students will be introduced to the world of simple electronics and programming, and will have an opportunity to develop their skills by designing and building an electronic device of choice.

Please note that there is a $70 fee to cover the purchase of the custom course equipment pack.  This fee is due upon application submission.

Enrolment Limit: 20 students
Application Deadline: September 10, 2014 at 1pm

Winter 2015 Modules

A Celebration of Winter as Place (ARTSSCI/ISCI 3IE1)

Instructors: Bob Henderson and Patrick Byrne

Winter is the misunderstood season. We will explore winter as a fundamental expression of Canadian identity through the lenses of history, geography, and literature. While travelling by snowshoes and skis, and of course sitting around the fire, we will examine key stories and characters in our Canadian understanding of winter, including Franklin, wendigos, Sam Magee, and Grey Owl. This exploration will also include the “idea of North” and the Norwegian friluftsliv approach to winter outdoor life. The central goal is to embrace the winter season as a “place” in our personal psyche and Canadian consciousness.

To do this we must be active in a thriving winter place where we are engaged in winter chores of chopping wood for our fires, drawing water from our ice hole, and clearing roofs of burdensome snow. We will learn the key winter activities of snowshoeing, cross-country skiing, building a snow shelter (Quinzee) and setting up a wall tent wood stove camp. This course will take place in Algonquin Park from February 19th – February 22nd.

Please note that there is a $200 trip fee to cover accommodations, transportation, and equipment rentals.  A $100 deposit is due upon application submission.

Enrolment Limit: 15 students
Application Deadline: September 10, 2014 at 1:00 pm

Electronics for the Rest of Us, Part II: Adventure in the Making (ARTSSCI/ISCI 3IE1)

Instructors: Dale Askey, Jason Brodeur, John Fink and Matt McCallow
Prerequisite: “Electronics for the Rest of Us!” or permission of the instructor.

In this intermediate-level course, students will further develop their electronic prototyping and production skills to conceptualize, design and prototype a working electronic device. Individually or in groups, students will work in an internally-motivated manner, where instructors provide support, resources, instruction and guidance as needed. Students may choose to work with their previously-purchased Arduino devices and peripherals, or may consider other devices such as Raspberry Pis, Beaglebone boards, Phidgets and Microsoft Kinects.

This module will run on the evenings of Tuesday 13 January, Tuesday 10 February and Tuesday 3 March.

Enrolment Limit: 20 students
Application Deadline: January 9, 2015 at 1:00 pm

Introduction to Forensic Investigation (ARTSSCI/ISCI 3IE1)

Instructors: Russ Ellis and Sarah Symons

Forensic science plays a crucial role in the criminal justice system. Interest in forensic science has increased dramatically in the recent years largely due to investigative television shows like CSI:Crime Scene Investigation, NCIS and Bones. Contrary to popular view, forensic experts do not “solve” crimes or “prove” guilt, they analyse evidence and indicate the likelihood of events. The emphasis on rigorous critical approaches and communication of results is obviously useful to young scientists and thinkers in any discipline.

This module is an introduction to the basic processes of forensic investigation. Topics will include crime scene investigation, evidence analysis, forensic anthropology, and the legal system over a six week period. Each week, material will be presented by expert professionals in selected fields of forensics for one hour, followed by an hour of hands-on experimentation in related topics. The course will run for 6 consecutive Monday evenings starting 23 February- 30 March 2015.

Please note that there is a $30 course materials fee.  This fee is due upon application submission.

Enrolment Limit: 16 students
Application Deadline: September 10, 2014 at 1:00 pm

Fall 2013 Modules

Egyptian Hieroglyphs (ARTSSCI/ISCI 3IE1)

Instructor: Sarah Symons

This module is an introduction to the script used by ancient Egyptians to decorate temples, tombs, and artefacts. Participants will learn principles of reading and translation via a combination of worksheets, exercises, and object studies. The objects are drawn from museum collections around the world and offer insight not only into the  language but also into the culture of ancient Egypt. The module will run in later Sept. and Oct. 2013 with four two-hour evening workshops and some out-of-class study.  The module will end with a Saturday visit to the Royal Ontario Museum to view the Egyptian collection and try out newly-acquired reading skills.

Enrolment Limit: 20 students
Module Information

Kentucky Caving Fieldtrip (ARTSSCI/ISCI 3IE1)

Instructors: John Maclachlan and Chad Harvey

This is a five-day fieldtrip to Cave City, Kentucky (18- 21 Oct. 2013) to explore karstic geomorphology, perform underground biological inventories, discuss the rich local caving history, and consider the environmental issues caused by mismanagement of these natural features. Among the caves visited will be the Hidden River Cave System, Cub Run Cave and an extensive tour of the largest cave system in the world, Mammoth Cave. Student evaluation will be based upon a pre-trip assignment, course participation, and a post-course reflection.

Enrolment Limit: 18 students
Module Information

Grant Writing: Integrating Science, Sustainability and Community (ARTSSCI/ISCI 3IE1)

Instructor: Chad Harvey

The ability to research, write and apply for grant funding is a skill that is truly interdisciplinary.  Whether an individual is pursuing a career in academics, government, or private industry, proficiency in grant writing is necessary and a highly marketable asset. Students will experience the entire grant writing process, from research of potential funding sources; scripting an appropriate background, purpose, budget and timeline; to writing and submission of the finished grant application.

Grants will be sought to support and maintain community outreach initiatives here at McMaster. Examples of these initiatives include the McMaster Teaching & Community Garden (MTCG), McMaster Outdoor Learning Space (MOLS), McMaster Eco-Lab (MEL), and McMarsh, a reclamation project for Lot M.

Enrolment Limit: 8 students
Module Information

Winter 2014 Modules

Electronics for the Rest of Us! (ARTSSCI/ISCI 3IE1)

Instructors: Dale Askey and Jason Brodeur

To most of us, the workings of the electronic devices that accompany (and enable!) our everyday lives often seem mysterious and opaque, an area of concern for only the most qualified “techies.” Though a basic understanding of electronics and programming is generally viewed as a core competency for 21st century success, these topics remain intimidating, as they often appear inaccessible to many students from non-technical disciplines. This doesn’t have to be the case.  The development and widespread availability of inexpensive, user-friendly and well-documented electronics — such as the Arduino — has made learning and developing these skills accessible (and dare we say, even fun) for students of every age. Such resources now make it possible for even the most inexperienced student to create with electronics, while simultaneously reaping the educational benefits associated with the application of logic and rules to make cool stuff.

Over the span of 5 classes and open access to equipment and documentation, students will be introduced to the world of simple electronics and programming, and will have an opportunity to develop their skills by designing and building an electronic device of choice.

Enrolment Limit: 20 students
Module Information

Information and Media Literacy (ARTSSCI/ISCI 3IE1)

Instructors: John Maclachlan and Rhonda Moore

This one-unit module will offer students an opportunity to learn (current) new media skills such as graphic design, web production, video production, and social media engagement, with a strong focus on media and information literacy. The module will be structured to include 5 two-hour workshops, as well as “Mini New Media Assignments” to be completed outside tutorial and submitted before the next workshop. In addition to this, there will be a large, self-directed group assignment that will incorporate building new media for various areas in the city of Hamilton.

Enrolment Limit: 12 students
Module Information

A Celebration of Winter as Place (ARTSSCI/ISCI 3IE1)

Instructors: Bob Henderson and Patrick Byrne

Winter is the misunderstood season. We will explore winter as a fundamental expression of Canadian identity through the lenses of history, geography, and literature. While travelling by snowshoes and skis, and of course sitting around the fire, we will examine key stories and characters in our Canadian understanding of winter, including Franklin, wendigos, Sam Magee, and Grey Owl. This exploration will also include the “idea of North” and the Norwegian friluftsliv approach to winter outdoor life. The central goal is to embrace the winter season as a “place” in our personal psyche and Canadian consciousness.

To do this we must be active in a thriving winter place where we are engaged in winter chores of chopping wood for our fires, drawing water from our ice hole, and clearing roofs of burdensome snow. We will learn the key winter activities of snowshoeing, cross-country skiing, building a snow shelter (Quinzee) and setting up a wall tent wood stove camp. This course will take place in Algonquin Park during the weekend of Friday 17 January- Sunday 19 January 2014.

Enrolment Limit: 15 students
Module Information

Further Egyptian Hieroglyphs (ARTSSCI/ISCI 3IE1)

Instructor: Sarah Symons

This course of four two-hour workshops builds on the previous ARTSSCI 3IE1 “Egyptian Hieroglyphs” module, with an emphasis on learning more about the structure of the language (“Middle Egyptian”) behind the hieroglyphic script. The format will be similar, and involves learning through worksheets and discussion.

Prerequisite: A pass in ARTSSCI 3IE1 “Egyptian Hieroglyphs.” (Students must be up-to-date with concepts from this course.)

Enrolment Limit: 20 students
Module Information

Leadership & Mentorship Module (ARTSSCI/ISCI 3IE1)

Instructor: Sarah Robinson

Students will participate in five two-hour sessions (January-March 2014) with some additional preparation to develop strategies that will optimize leadership and mentorship skills. Those enrolled will be given the opportunity to practice these skills in a small, low-risk setting, and actively participate as a Student Leader in all workshop sessions within the iSci/Arts & Science Leadership Program. Active participation, preparation of workshop materials, and reflection pieces will be required.

Enrolment Limit: 10 students
Module Information

Fall 2012 Modules

Kentucky Caving Fieldtrip (ARTSSCI/ISCI 3IE1)

Instructor: John Maclachlan

This is a four-day fieldtrip (Friday through Monday, 16-19 Nov. 2012) to visit karstic geomorphology features, investigate their form and origin, and consider the environmental issues caused by mismanagement of these natural features.  Students will be required to complete a pre-trip quiz and will be evaluated on the basis of participation and a field notebook.

Enrolment Limit: 20 students

Caving (2012)Student Spelunkers Trade Class Work for Caving
From McMaster Daily News, 12 December 2012

“Celebrated cave explorer Floyd Collins became trapped in a narrow underground passageway while searching for a new entrance to Kentucky’s popular Mammoth Caves in 1925.”

Read more…

 

 

Winter 2013 Modules

Aboriginal Fieldtrip (ARTSSCI/ISCI 3IE1)

Instructor: Sarah Glen

This module will take students to Six Nations to learn traditional Ojibwa culture, values, and beliefs in relation to the natural environment. The fieldtrip will consist of two full-day workshops, Sat.-Sun. 9-10 Mar., guided by Aboriginal knowledge keepers Mark and Wendy Phillips and Aboriginal community leader Josh Dockstator. Students will explore the natural environment, take part in a sunrise ceremony, learn to build a sweat lodge, and have the option of taking part in the sweat ceremony. Participants will be required to meet Fri. 8 Mar. on campus to discuss the assignments, explore expectations, and meet Josh, Wendy and Mark. Requirements include three readings in advance of the excursion, a series of reflective exercises throughout the fieldtrip, as well as a short reflective essay once the fieldtrip is over. Students will be evaluated on the basis of their participation and their written work.

Enrolment Limit: 15 students

Aboriginal Fieldtrip (2013)Living With Our Land
From McMaster Daily News, 21 March 2013

“Earlier this month, a team of McMaster students traveled to Six Nations in Ohsweken, Ontario to learn more about Aboriginal culture, values and beliefs in relation to the natural environment in Southern Ontario.”

Read more…

Egyptian Hieroglyphs (ARTSSCI/ISCI 3IE1)

Instructor: Sarah Symons

This module is an introduction to the script used by ancient Egyptians to decorate temples, tombs, and artefacts. Participants will learn principles of reading and translation via a combination of worksheets,  exercises, and object studies.  The objects are drawn from museum  collections around the world and offer insight not only into the  language but also into the culture of ancient Egypt. 

The module will run in January and early February with four two-hour evening workshops and some out-of-class study.  The module will end with a Saturday visit to the Royal Ontario Museum to view the Egyptian collection and try out newly-acquired reading skills. For more  information, contact the instructor, Dr. Sarah Symons, symonss@mcmaster.ca.

Enrolment Limit: 20 students

Leadership & Mentorship (ARTSSCI/ISCI 3IE1)

Instructor: Sarah Robinson

Students will participate in five two-hour sessions (January-March) with some additional preparation to develop strategies that will optimize leadership and mentorship skills.  Those enrolled will be given the opportunity to practice these skills in a small, low-risk setting, and actively participate as a Student Leader in all workshop sessions within the iSci/Arts & Science Leadership Program.  Active participation, preparation of workshop materials, and reflection pieces will be required.

Enrolment Limit: 10 students

Grant Writing (ARTSSCI/ISCI 3IE1)

Instructor: Chad Harvey

This module develops the interdisciplinary skills of researching and writing an application for grant funding. It is an independent project, with students working on their own or in pairs, under the supervision of the instructor and in collaboration with the Office of Sustainability. Timeline will vary according to particular grant deadlines. Students will achieve the entire grant-writing experience: researching potential funding sources to support a chosen initiative on campus; scripting an appropriate background, purpose, budget and timeline; writing and submitting the completed grant application.

Enrolment Limit: 8 students

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